The reasons are abundant but these are our top 5:

  1. At least 1/3 of your garbage is compostable. Food is a valuable resource that doesn't belong in the trash.
  2. Food rots in landfills, emitting greenhouse gases and noxious odors and impacting climate change. Who wants that?
  3. Compost restores depleted nutrients to the soil and therefore to our food.
  4. Composting replenishes eroding soil by putting organic material back where it belongs- in the earth.
  5. It's inspiring. Composting gives your food a second chance at life. It is the soul of your soil

Btw, if you don't need all your compost, we'll donate it on your behalf. Scroll down to see where it will go.

  can you spot an onion peel, MELON RIND, OR EGG SHELL? wE CAN'T EITHER but this use to be food.    COMPOSTED FOOD BECOMES BLACK GOLD bringing new life to your  LAWN, FLOWER BED OR GARDEN.

can you spot an onion peel, MELON RIND, OR EGG SHELL? wE CAN'T EITHER but this use to be food.

COMPOSTED FOOD BECOMES BLACK GOLD bringing new life to your  LAWN, FLOWER BED OR GARDEN.


Urban Farm Partners

Don't need all your compost? We'll donate it, on your behalf, to one of our urban farm partners.

Our farm partners grow fresh produce on vacant lots in Newark-- designated by the USDA as a food desert.  By composting, you are not only are keeping food out of land fills, you are helping your neighbors enjoy healthy, locally grown food. Environmental + social benefits? It's a win-win.

The SWAG Project Urban Farm

343 Meeker Ave, Newark

Swag is an Urban Farm, Food Justice and Community Building project in the South Ward of Newark. Dedicated to providing community food access and increasing educational and economic opportunities for local residents, SWAG works to empower residents to take control of their local food system and health.

The Green Community Farm

114 South 8th Street, Newark | Master Gardner: Carla Green

Carla Green, has been participating in Newark’s Adopt-A-Lot program since May 2010. As a young girl growing up in Jamaica, she has fond memories of helping her mother grow flowers and fruit trees as well as visits to her grandparent’s working farm. Carla’s diagnosis with diabetes type 2 and her enthusiasm for healthy living motivated her to grow fresh whole foods to manage a difficult and chronic illness.  With the lack of the availability of real food in the supermarkets, she wanted to do more. The garden production increases steadily each year and food is donated weekly to residents in the immediate community.  Her current  partnerships are with the Victoria Foundation, Newark Community Solutions, Rutgers Cooperative Extension and Essex County 4H, and The Urban League of Essex County.